OBLAlogo-white copy.png

CHALLENGE

NUTRITION GUIDE

DSC00199_edited.png

CALCULATE YOUR TDEE

CALCULATE YOUR TDEE

Whether you're looking to lose body fat, maintain, or build muscle, you will first want to find your TDEE- total daily energy expenditure. In short, your TDEE is the amount of calories you burn daily, including the amount of activity. This number varies greatly depending on age, gender, height, weight, and of course, activity level. You will need to use this number to determine how much you should be eating daily to reach your goals. We will outline this more in a future nutrition guide video, but you can use this “TDEE Calculator” to calculate your starting point.

 

GUIDE TO LOSING BODY FAT

Once you find your TDEE, you will want to eat slightly below this number. When doing so, you want to make sure to maintain enough calories to sustain energy, maintain muscle mass, body functions, etc. This differs on how much body fat you’re trying to lose, where your starting point is, your muscle mass, and many other factors. Usually, the leaner you are, the slower your rate of fat loss. Starting slow helps to decrease the risk of muscle loss. This is important because having more muscle mass helps to increase your metabolism- which in turn will also help you to lose body fat.

Eating at a caloric deficit

The number of calories you want to eat below your TDEE will also depend on how fast you need to reach your goal, and what’s maintainable for you. Use these tips below to ensure you're making the right adjustments.

The number of calories you want to eat below your TDEE will depend on how fast you need to reach your goal, and what’s maintainable. We recommend starting between 200-500 calories below your TDEE

In general, dropping 3500 calories a week (500 calorie deficit per day) will drop 1lb per week. 

Track your progress, and adjust as needed. You can increase or decrease this number by 100 calories at a time.

If you notice you are losing body fat too quickly, this may be a reaction, especially if you're just getting started. Know that losing body fat too quickly might not be sustainable over time, so it's important to listen to your body and make realistic adjustments. If this is happening for more than a few weeks, you may need to increase your caloric deficit by at least 100 calories.

If you notice you are NOT losing body fat at all, or even notice weight gain, this could also be a reaction and is nothing to be worried about. Your body may be getting acclimated to your workouts and food intake. If you notice this is happening for more than a few weeks, you my need to decrease your caloric deficit by at least 100 calories. 

WHAT calories you eat matter as well, especially when it comes to muscle mass, digestion, water retention/bloating, etc. Try to avoid highly processed foods, artificial fillers, and foods with high sodium or sugar content. Also, you do not have to track your calorie intake forever. Once you have a good understanding of what works for you and what your body needs, you can eat more intuitively while still reaching your goals!

GUIDE TO BUILDING MUSCLE

Once you find your TDEE, you will want to eat a calorie amount above this number. This differs on how much muscle or weight  you’re trying to gain, where your starting point is, your muscle mass, and many other factors. We recommend starting slow with the increase of caloric surplus to help your digestion. 

Eating at a caloric surplus

The number of calories you want to eat above your TDEE will also depend on how fast you need to reach your goal, and what’s maintainable for you. Use these tips below to ensure you're making the right adjustments.

Track your progress, and adjust as needed. You can increase or decrease this number by 100 calories at a time.

In general, adding 3500 calories a week (500 calorie increase per day) will potentially gain up to 1lb of muscle/body fat per week. Track your progress, and adjust as needed. 

When increasing muscle and weight, you may also put on some body fat due to the surplus of calories. Increasing the calories with nutrient dense foods can help to decrease the amount of body fat gained.

In order to gain muscle mass, you have to make sure you're getting in enough protein and carbs. We recommend eating at least .6g per pound of weight to ensure you're building and recovering properly. Carb intake will vary from person to person but it is important for maintaining high energy levels as you increase in resistance and training intensity over time. Use the video below as a guide to determine how much protein you should be eating. 

We recommend starting between 200-500 calories above your TDEE

Protein thumbnail.jpeg

WHAT calories you eat matter as well, especially when it comes to gaining muscle mass, digestion, water retention/bloating, etc. Try to avoid highly processed foods, artificial fillers, and foods with high sodium or sugar content. Also, you do not have to track your calorie intake forever. Once you have a good understanding of what works for you and what your body needs, you can eat more intuitively while still reaching your goals!

EXAMPLE OF DAILY MEALS

EXAMPLE OF DAILY MEALS

Toya's Intake for losing body fat:

My TDEE is approximately 2100 calories. With a goal of losing 3lbs in 6 weeks, I will eat around 1900 calories a day (200 calorie deficit), which will leave me losing about 1.5-2 lbs per month. This is a good maintainable caloric level for me until I am at a comfortable body fat that I wish to maintain. 

 

I  typically do well on a balance of 35% carbs, 35% protein, 30% fat. This has worked for ME, and we recommend finding a balance through trial and error that works for you. When cutting body fat, a moderate level of each has worked vest for my body.

 

The below example has me right at about 1900 calories, with the macronutrient breakdown from above. This also keeps me below my daily sodium and sugar recommendations as well.

Breakfast:

2 whole eggs

Protein oatmeal: ½ cup oats, ½ serving protein

¾ cup blueberries

 

 

Lunch:

4 oz chicken breast

4 oz sweet potato

Salad with mixed greens, 1 oz avocado, balsamic vinegar, cucumbers

 

Post workout Smoothie:

1 serving protein powder

1 serving PB2

1 tablespoon cacao

1 tbsp flaxseed

 

Dinner:

5 oz salmon

5 oz sweet potato

1 cup broccoli

 

Snack:

2 chocolate rice cakes

1 tbsp. Peanut butter

THUMBNAIL-10.jpg

Breakfast:

Breakfast burrito with air fried potatoes: 

1 flat out wrap with

3 egg whites,

2 slicesturkey bacon,

salsa

4 oz red potatoes cooked in air fryer

 

Lunch:

Grilled chicken sandwich:

5 ounce chicken breast

1 sandwich thin roll

2 oz avocado

Mixed greens

 

Snack/post workout:

Protein shake:

1 banana

1 serving protein powder

1 scoop of PB2

Cacao

flax seed

 

Dinner:

Ground Turkey burgers, 5oz

5oz sweet potato

2 cups broccoli

 

Snack:

1 cup greek yogurt with blueberries

2 chocolate rice cakes

1 tbsp peanut butter 

DSC00363-Edit_edited.png

Toya's Intake for building muscle mass:

My TDEE is approximately 2100 calories. With a goal of gaining about 3lbs in 8 weeks, I will eat around 2300 calories a day (200 calorie surplus), which will leave me gaining about 1.5-2 lbs per month. This is a good maintainable caloric level for me until I am at a comfortable weight that I wish to maintain. 

 

When building muscle or gaining weight, I typically do well on a balance of 40% carbs, 35% protein, 25% fat. This has worked for ME, find a balance through trial and error that works for you.

 

The below example has me right at about 2300 calories, with the macronutrient breakdown from above. This also keeps me below my daily sodium and sugar recommendations:

TRACK FOODS & PROGRESS

MY FITNESS PAL

There are many different apps and programs to help you track your calories and progress but we personally use the app MY FITNESS PAL. This app allows you to track foods by manual entry, or by scanning the bar code to a particular product. The app shows you a detailed breakdown of each food item so that you can accurately log everything you eat. 

The app also calculates a calorie intake based on your goals and you can see the macronutrient breakdown along with sugar and sodium intake. This will ensure that you have all of the information you need to make necessary adjustments over time. If you're having trouble with weight gain, or loss, we will likely ask you to modify this information so that you're tracking correctly moving forward. 

myfitnesspal.jpeg

TRACKING YOUR PROGRESS

Over the course of time, you'll likely use a scale to measure and track your physical progress. While this can be useful in many ways, your body composition will change but it may not reflect on the scale. Know that the amount of mass you lose or gain on the scale can be manipulated by muscle mass and many other factors. So, we recommend using different forms of tracking to make sure you're progressing consistently and so that you're not discouraged if the scale isn't budging. 

  • Get a Dexa or Bod Pod body composition scan monthly (Most Accurate)

  • Use measuring tape to see how different areas of your body are changing.

  • Use clothing as a reference to your progress. Try on a shirt or pair of jeans over time and assess how the fit has changed.

  • Take Progress photos to see the minor physical changes that might not reflect on the scale. 

If you need additional information on how to use these forms of tracking, check out the video we linked below:

track progress.jpeg

Grocery List 

As we mentioned, it is not realistic or sustainable to track every calorie forever. Learning how to eat intuitively is a great way to help you create balance within your lifestyle while still eating towards your goals. Eating intuitively simply means that you are listening to your body, and eating things that feel good for YOU and YOUR body. You understand how foods make you feel, how long they keep you full, are they giving you energy or making you feel sluggish, etc. Your energy needs can vary day to day depending on your goals, activity levels, hormones, and many other factors. Therefore, understanding your body and listening to the foods it needs can be more beneficial than tracking in the long run. However, tracking your foods at times can be a good tool to help you understand the breakdown of the calories you are eating, and help you understand your body’s needs. 

 

Whether eating intuitively or tracking, you want to put an emphasis on eating more nutrient dense foods. We have created a basic grocery list broken down in macronutrients (carbs, fats and proteins). Having this list can help you when putting together different meals and ensuring you are getting a good balance of each of the three macronutrients.

 

*Just because something isn’t on this list, does not mean you cant have it! This is just a basic guide!

Carbohydrates:

Vegetables:

  • Asparagus

  • Broccoli

  • Bok Choy

  • Spinach

  • Kale 

  • Zucchini 

  • Celery

  • Mushrooms - many varieties

  • Grean Beans

  • Bell Peppers

  • Onions, many varieties

  • Cucumber 

  • Carrots

  • Cauliflower (riced, mashed)

  • Squashes- spaghetti, butternut, yellow

  • Beets

  • Okra

  • Eggplant 

  • Tomatoes 

  • Brussels Sprouts

  • Cabbage 

  • Lettuce

  • Edamame

Fruits:

  • Berries- strawberries, blue/black/raspberries

  • Grapes

  • Pineapple

  • Bananas

  • Apples- many varieties

  • Mango

  • Melons- many varieties

  • Oranges 

  • Kiwi 

  • Peaches

  • Nectarines

  • Apricots

  • Pomegranate

  • Grapefruit 

Grains/Starches

  • Sweet Potatoes

  • Yellow/Red/Russet Potatoes

  • Rice- many varieties

  • Beans-many varieties

  • Tortillas- many varieties

  • Quinoa 

  • Chickpeas

  • Whole Grain Pastas

  • Farro

  • Whole Grain Flours/Breads

Proteins:

  • Fish: Salmon, Cod, Tuna, Tilapia, Shrimp

  • Eggs (whites are protein, yolk is fat)

  • Lean Ground Turkey

  • Lean Ground Beef

  • Chicken Breast

  • Deli meat- chicken, turkey 

  • Deer 

  • Buffalo

  • Edamame

  • Tofu

  • Tempeh

  • Low fat cottage cheese

  • Greek Yogurt- plain

  • Protein Powder

Fats:

  • Nuts: almonds, cashews, pistachios, walnuts, peanuts

  • Avocados

  • Nut butters- almond, cashey, peanut (watch for added sugars)

  • Seeds: chia, flax, pumpkin, sunflower, hemp, sesame 

  • Olive oil 

  • Coconut

  • Hummus 

  • Eggs (the yolk is fat)

 

Condiments/Sauces/Spices/Dressings/Etc

  • Stevia 

  • Cinnamon

  • Garlic spices

  • Onion spices

  • Yellow mustard

  • Hot sauce

  • Vinegars- balsamic, apple cider, red wine, rice

  • Horseradish

  • Soy sauce

  • Salsa 

  • Worcestershire sauce

  • Cacao powder

  • Monkfruit 

  • Sauerkraut

  • Hummus

  • Tahini 

  • Pesto 

  • Nutritional Yeast